How does screen time affect kids’ brains? The first results of a landmark study are alarming.

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  • The study uses MRI scans to track the changes in the brains of children who use screens at varying amounts.
  • Early results revealed that kids who use screens for more than 7 hours per day show physical changes to the brain in the form of premature thinning of the cortex.
  • It will likely be decades before scientists truly understand how smartphones and other technologies affect the brain.

How does screen time affect the developing brains of young kids?

That’s the big question behind a $300-million study conducted by the National Institutes of Health that’s using MRI scans to examine changes in brain structure among children who use smartphones and other screen devices. The first batch of results from the study, which was highlighted by CBS’s 60 Minutes on Sunday, shows that kids who spent more than two hours per day on screens scored lower on language and thinking tests.

Alarmingly, kids who spent more than seven hours per day on electronic devices showed premature thinning of the cortex, which Dr. Gaya Dowling of the National Institutes of Health described as a “maturational process” that typically happens later in development.

“We don’t know if it’s being caused by the screen time,” said Dowling. “We don’t know yet if it’s a bad thing. It won’t be until we follow them over time that we will see if there are outcomes that are associated with the differences that we’re seeing in this single snapshot.”

It will take a few years to get answers to some of the questions raised by the study. However, the most interesting results will likely come decades from now, when researchers can see the long-term effects of technology use on the brain. Dr. Dimitri Christakis of Seattle Children’s Hospital, the lead author of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ most recent guidelines for screen time, told CBS he’s concerned about this uncertainty.

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