After incoming missile warning, people in Hawaii wonder what to do with last moments of life.

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“This is how you’re going to die—in a place that’s a paradise.”

A screen shot take by Hawaiian citizen Alison Teal shows the screen of her mobile phone with an alert text message sent to all Hawaiian citizens on January 13, 2018. 
        Hawaii officials swiftly confirmed a cell phone alert warning of an incoming ballistic missile was a 'false alarm' on January 13, 2018,  but not before the ominous message unnerved residents and stirred confusion across the US state. The warning -- which came across the Emergency Alert System that authorities nationwide use to delivery vital emergency information -- read: 'Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill.' / AFP PHOTO / Alison TEAL        (Photo credit should read ALISON TEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A screenshot taken by Hawaiian citizen Alison Teal shows an alert text message sent to all Hawaiian citizens on January 13, 2018.

ALISON TEAL/Getty Images

Kris Fortner was enjoying a few additional minutes of snooze time.

The 45-year-old had just arrived to the Westin Nanea in Maui from the San Francisco Bay Area on Friday night, and his wife, Cathy Fortner, decided to let him sleep a bit more, so she took their two daughters for breakfast. Suddenly, Fortner was jolted out of the bed by a terrifying sound coming from his iPhone. The message shook him to the core: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

“I jumped up and got dressed but I kept looking at my phone, wondering, ‘Is this real?’ I wanted to keep thinking this has to be a test, but the message clearly said it wasn’t,” Fortner said. “I realized I had to find my family.”

Just as he was about to leave, Cathy Fortner arrived back in the room with their daughters, Julia, 6, and Maebe, 4. “She showed up in tears,” Fortner recalls, with a tone of incredulity in his voice as if he couldn’t yet reconcile the events of the previous few hours. “The hotel staff had received the same alert and told everyone to go back into their rooms and shelter in place.” People were running around outside, many in a veritable state of panic. Amid all the commotion, Fortner tried to keep his daughters occupied so they wouldn’t realize what was going on.

“I don’t know what I’m supposed to do when something like this happens,” Fortner said. So the communications specialist did what came naturally: He looked for answers on Twitter. Once he started seeing a few tweets that it was all a false alarm, he wanted to celebrate but was wary of doing so prematurely. He didn’t know who to trust. “I didn’t get why it took so long for information to get out,” he said. It wasn’t until the all-clear message came into his iPhone at 8:47 a.m.—40 minutes after the first warning—that he was able to relax.

This photo illustration screenshot taken by the photographer of his cell phone shows messages of emergency alerts on January 13, 2018 of Honolulu, Hawaii. 
        Social media ignited on January 13, 2018 after apparent screenshots of cell phone emergency alerts warning of a 'ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii' began circulating, which US officials quickly dismissed as 'false.
This screenshot shows messages of emergency alerts on January 13, 2018 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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