A new brain-inspired computer takes us one step closer to simulating brain neural networks in real-time

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“It is presently unclear which computer architecture is best suited to study whole-brain networks efficiently. The European Human Brain Project and Jülich Research Centre have performed extensive research to identify the best strategy for this highly complex problem. Today’s supercomputers require several minutes to simulate one second of real time, so studies on processes like learning, which take hours and days in real time are currently out of reach.” explains Professor Markus Diesmann, co-author, head of the Computational and Systems Neuroscience department at the Jülich Research Centre.


He continues, “There is a huge gap between the energy consumption of the brain and today’s supercomputers. Neuromorphic (brain-inspired) computing allows us to investigate how close we can get to the energy efficiency of the brain using electronics.”


Developed over the past 15 years and based on the structure and function of the human brain, SpiNNaker—part of the Neuromorphic Computing Platform of the Human Brain Project—is a custom-built computer composed of half a million of simple computing elements controlled by its own software. The researchers compared the accuracy, speed and of SpiNNaker with that of NEST—a specialist software currently in use for neuron-signaling research.

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