7 myths from biology class that most people still believe.

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Science classes are supposed to give students not only the most up-to-date knowledge and information but also a belief in the scientific method and perhaps imbue them with the logic and reasoning skills associated with it. Trouble is, there are a lot of myths out there that sabotage these lofty goals. In fact, many of them originate in science classes themselves, taught over and over by teachers too lazy to look them up. Despite already being debunked, they persist. Here are 7 commonly held myths from biology class you probably still believe.

1. Humans sit atop the food chain

Food web. Credit: Socratic.

Sometimes you’ll hear the carnivorous among us exclaim, “I didn’t fight my way to the top of the food chain to eat a salad.” Though we may understand their meaning, the concept behind it is dead wrong. That’s because the food chain metaphor itself is too simplistic. It’s more like a food web, which more accurately portrays how energy is passed among organisms in a certain ecosystem.

Food webs are made up of food chains, which are when energy is transferred up in a linear fashion. The trouble with the food chain is, there are usually multiple organisms who are both predator and prey. Many organisms can eat multiple things and conversely be consumed by multiple predators. The food chain model also often ignores the producers at the bottom. As such, a food web, although still imperfect, is a far more precise model.

2. Respiration is synonymous with breathing

Cellular respiration. Credit: Sheri Amsel, Exploring Nature.

Most people think respiration and breathing are the same thing. That is, sadly, nowhere near true. While we’ve got a good handle on what breathing is, respiration is when muscles release glucose during physical activity, like exercise. Glucose is the body’s fuel. We use it for energy. This misconception may be due to the fact that study of the respiratory system focuses mainly on breathing. And therein lies the confusion. 

3. Cats and dogs are colorblind

Credit: Stocksnap, Pixababy.

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